Did We Miss the End of the World?

Mayan Calendar
Source: Sputnik International

The common factor that all doomsday predictions share is that they never happen. People have been making predictions about when the world is going to end since time immemorial. Tribal elders, mystic sages, religious leaders and even scientists have all attempted to predict when exactly the world is going to end. Armageddon in the form of absolute destruction and death has luckily never made its way to earth, but there are a number of doomsday devotees that are certain that the collapse of the world as we know it is imminent.

1. 2012 Apocalypse and the Mayan Calendar

One of the most popular doomsday predictions to capture the attention of the world was the 2012 apocalypse. Meant to take place on 21 December 2012, the day marked the end of the first cycle of the Mayan long count calendar, which many misinterpreted as the beginning of the end of the world. At the time, the calendar had concluded its 5,125 yearlong cycle and was quickly touted as the necessary evidence needed to back doomsday preppers’ claims of imminent and absolute destruction. This was a massive misinterpretation of century-old information and all sorts of end-of-world scenarios came to the fore. These included the annihilation of the human race as a result of solar flares, the realignment of the earth’s axis, cosmic planetary collisions, as well as a supposed planetary alignment that would create massive tidal waves to bring on cataclysmic floods the likes of which would make Noah raise an eyebrow. As we already know, this wasn’t the case and most people went about their lives on December 22, quickly forgetting the hysteria and mass panic that had recently gripped the world.

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2. A Confluence of Events in 2015

23 September 2015 was heralded as the day that humanity would be destroyed. The prediction was based on the fact that many important political, astronomical and scientific events were occurring on the same day, creating a catalyst that would usher in the demise of the planet. Events that occurred on or near 23 September included the autumnal equinox, Yom Kippur (Jewish Day of Atonement) and Eid-al-Adha (an important Muslim holiday known as “the Feat of the Sacrifice”). Concern was raised as CERN reinitiated its Large Hadron Collider during the same time, which had doomsday aficionados convinced that portals to another dimension would be opened.

3. Y2K Bug

As people were preparing to welcome the new millennium and celebrate the New Year, theories that all computers and technological devices would cease to function began popping up. This was based on the theory that computers would completely shut down when they reached 00 due to the practice of using two digits for years. A genuine sense of panic was created and people started stockpiling food, water and generators in the preparation for massive power outages and impending anarchy. The world, however, did not fall into chaos as predicted, and this type of prophecy is likely viewed as an insanely irrational assumption in today’s technologically advanced society.